Our Chef


Naris Maridirosian was born with a good appetite. Raised near her grandfather’s fruit orchard, she knew the taste of cherries, apricots, and figs repined to perfection by her first birthday—and nothing less would do.
At the age of four she and her family immigrated to the US, and to the fruit bowl of American agriculture, California. They made a new home for themselves in Glendale, just outside of Los Angeles.

By six years old Naris was always at her mom’s side in the kitchen watching as pots of onions sizzled and rice soaked. She was introduced to the professional food world in the ninth grade, when she enrolled in her high school’s nascent culinary program.

Her instructor saw something in the fledgling culinarian and within weeks Naris was working for the instructor’s catering business. But it wasn’t all galettes and glory from the start; Naris was made the official scullery (i.e. dishwashing) maid. After proving herself as an accomplished pot scrubber, she made it onto the line.

After graduating from high school, Naris had her sights on culinary school; she packed her bags and moved to Hyde Park, NY, where she attended The Culinary Institute of America and earned an associate’s degree in culinary arts.

Since graduating, Naris has honed her palette and her skills in the kitchens of Thomas Keller, Mario Batali and Gordon Ramsay. Today she is a culinary producer for a number of TV cooking shows, cooks for private clients, and passionately advocates the beautiful seasonality and balanced simplicity of Armenian cooking via Armeniankitchen101.com. Her goal is to highlight not just the recipes on the website, but also teach curious cooks the basic techniques behind them.

See Naris in action, on national TV!
http://www.nbc.com/americas-next-great-restaurant/video/episode-102/1313690/

5 comments


  1. Janett Naldjian Lee

    I absolutely love this site. Its genious and necessary. I only know how to make Armenian dishes because of my grandmother and its a relief to have another place to go for recipes to some of the staple dishes in the Armenian culture. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  2. Gayane

    Thank you, I made fesenjan by your recipe it was easy but before I thought very hard and complicated dish.

  3. Taleen

    I was looking for a paska recipe when I found your website. I was wondering if you have an Easter paska recipe. I was hoping to make my own this year but, finding one that was from Armenians who used to live in Russia then immigrated to Iran and turned it into their tradition is difficult to find. Most recipes on the web are of Ukrainian origin, tasty but not the one I am used to. The ones I am looking for are light in texture and have bits of candied citrus it them. They are taller cylinder shaped and have the look of a panettone. They are not rolls, or “Peeps” shaped. I will keep my fingers crossed that maybe you have a recipe. THANK YOU!

  4. Its like you ead my mind! You appear to know a lot about this, like you wrote
    the book in itt or something. I think that you could do with a
    few pics to drive the message home a bit, but insead of that,
    this is wonderful blog. A fantastic read. I’ll definitely
    be back.

  5. Great info. Lucky me I discovered your website by
    chance (stumbleupon). I’ve book-marked it for later!

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